Duxford Airfield
Imperial War Museum
October, 4th 2015 Duxford Cambridge, UK
Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II
Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II

Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II

Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II
Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II
Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II
Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II
Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II
Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II
Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II
Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II
Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II
Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II
Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II
Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II
Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II
Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II
The Duxford Aerodrome was built during First World War and was one of the earliest Royal Air Force stations. By August 1918 the airfield was completed and became part of a newly formed service. In September 1918 Duxford opened as a flying school then became a home of the most famous RAF squadrons that flown with Gloster Gleber, Armstrong Withworth Bristol Bulldogs and the fastest fighter Gloster Gauntel. By summer 1938 made its first flight int the No. 19 squadron the mighty Supermarine Spitfire. But in September 1939 Second World War started and Duxford became a strategic airfield to the war operations. From Duxford airfield fighters took the air to defend Great Britain from German heavy bombers. At September 15th 1940 known as "Battle of Britain Day" squadrons of Spitfires took the air to repulse the Luftwaffe attack to London. In April 1943 the airfield was fully handed over to the United States 8th Air Force that was the largest of the United States Army Air Forces, counting more than 200,000 soldiers. American Thunderbolt gave air cover to the Allied fleet as it crossed the Channel. In the meanwhile the war finished with the surrender of Germany at the beginning of 1945 and Duxfor Airfield was officially handed back to the Royal Air Force in December 1945. The Americans left a concrete runway that was used by RAF squadron with his first jet-powered Gloster Meteor and then Gloster Javellin. Duxford Airfield was entering in his last operational phase. Its position became not so strategic and a expensive improvements required for supersonic jets could not be justified. So the last operational squadron took the air for the last time in 1961 and then the airport was closed. From then on, untill 1977, the destination ot this gloriuos airfoeild remained incertain. At that year the Imperial War Museum of London had been looking for a suitable site to storage a large historical aircraft. So the Duxford Aviation Society bought the airfield to give it new lease of life. Now Duxford is established as a European center of aviation history. The historic site, an outstanding collection of exhibits and regular world-renowned airshows combine to create a unique museum where the history really is in the air.